Arpeggios Guitar Lessons

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  • Thomas McRocklin
    • 7 Videos
    • 38 Mins

    In this lesson you’re going to learn some killer riffs and techniques that will push your prog playing to the limit. Starting with some simple progressions we’ll jam together and exchange solos then transform those chords into super tight, advanced prog riffs.

    If you’re still thirsty for more then come join me on a deep dive into sweeping arpeggios and how to lock your sweeping in time with a drum beat.

  • Thomas McRocklin
    • 3 Videos
    • 20 Mins

    Recently I was writing a new riff and I wasn’t quite sure where I wanted to go with it. It features a lot of interesting techniques which I’m going to break down for you…

    …but it’s not finished yet! That’s where you come in. I want you to learn my parts, then write your own ending and share your version with me in the members chat. Let’s do this!

  • Thomas McRocklin
    • 6 Videos
    • 44 Mins

    This lesson is all about percussive strumming and everything that goes with it! We start right with the basics of how you need to control each of your hands and build things up from there until you’re able to play these awesome, unique sounding licks.

    I even show you some cool ways to break up chords, introduce tap extensions and more – in fact the final part of this lesson contains possibly the most mind-blowing technique that I’ve ever heard!

  • Tim Hutchinson
    • 3 Videos
    • 16 Mins

    Today I’m going to show you one of my favourite go-to shred licks. This lick features a variety of techniques – sweep picking, hammer ons, pull offs – and a lot of muting to go along with those to improve your note separation and clarity.

    Before we get into the lick itself I’m also going to demonstrate my approach to playing major arpeggios – so that you can apply these skills to your own playing and licks!

  • Backing Track
    How To Solo
    Thomas McRocklin
    • 8 Videos
    • 49 Mins

    Do you feel lost when soloing, or feel like you’re just reciting scales and struggle to put together something cool and interesting?

    In this lesson I show you how to construct a solo from scratch, beginning with following a chord progression very closely and gradually introducing new approaches that you can use to access more interesting note choices and add variety to your playing.

  • Jesse Michel
    • 4 Videos
    • 14 Mins

    Today I’m going to show you guys a really cool warm up arpeggio exercise that includes: sweep picking (both ascending and descending), slides, taps, economy picking, bending and vibrato all wrapped in one lick.

    So if you’re looking to work on multiple techniques all in one this is the perfect lick for you!

  • Kieran Johnston
    • 3 Videos
    • 9 Mins

    In this lesson I’m going to teach you an awesome string skipped arpeggio sequence, very similar in style to one of my all-time favourite guitarists – Paul Gilbert.

    I’ll break this lick down for you and include plenty of insights and tips – including how you can put some variations on this lick and extend it with tapping, as well as some examples on how you can incorporate it into real-world playing situations.

  • Thomas McRocklin
    • 4 Videos
    • 39 Mins

    One of the questions I get asked a lot is – what tuning are you in? I always play in standard tuning, but the way you approach chords and phrasing in different keys can completely transform the way they sound.

    This lesson gives you all the insights into my approach to playing in my favourite keys. I’ll show you how to re-train your fingers to come up with some amazing sounds based on familiar shapes and how to layer harmonics onto chords to create epic soundscapes.

  • Thomas McRocklin
    • 6 Videos
    • 20 Mins

    I use arpeggios all of the time within licks or to transition between different parts of the neck when soloing.

    In this video I’m going to show you the major and minor arpeggio shapes that I think everyone should know, as well as some 3 octave and diminished patterns that are a bit less common but still amazingly useful.

    I also explain the best practices for fingering these patterns, and how to think ahead when playing to ensure your fingers are in the correct position during a transition.